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Regulations compel industries to implement safety instrumented systems

4th September 2013


European process and discrete industries are bouncing back from the economic downturn and focus on improving their production.

The improving market conditions encourage them to invest in new automation technologies and production innovations, including safety instrumented systems (SISs).

New analysis from Frost & Sullivan, Analysis of European Safety Instrumented Systems Market, finds that the market earned revenues of $510.1 million in 2012 and estimates this to reach $665.4 million in 2017.

Greater production creates a need for more intensive control of the process, especially its efficiency and safety. SISs allow users to control the health of the plant’s equipment and shut down the process, in case the preset conditions have been violated.

There has been a marked shift in attitude among manufacturers towards workplace safety. They acknowledge that the implementation of safety solutions and prevention of work-related injuries is more economical than incurring legal and hospitalisations costs. They also realise that SISs will help them reduce downtime and comply with environmental norms.

“Current SISs are more reliable, easy to extend due to their modular construction, and can flawlessly integrate with other control systems,” said Frost & Sullivan Industrial Automation & Process Control Research Manager Sivakumar Narayanaswamy. “Owing to their technological refinement, demand is increasing not only among previously conservative end users, but also among those who are dissatisfied with their existing SISs.

Meanwhile, the publication of the IEC 61508 and IEC 61511 standards has enhanced end-user awareness of the benefits of performing risk analysis. The guidelines for assessing hazards and planning safety management are prompting end users to be more accountable for the safety of their workers and plants and conducting rigorous analysis to prevent possible plant breakdowns.

Despite these obvious advantages, some process and discrete industries in southern Europe tend to consider industrial automation, including SISs, a nonessential expenditure. At a time when users are looking to reduce operating and maintenance costs, there is a reluctance to invest in new technologies that require additional service and support from the supplier.

“SISs suppliers need to concentrate on regions that have not been particularly affected by the Euro zone crisis,” noted Narayanaswamy. “They will do well to target the Benelux countries, central and eastern Europe and Scandinavia due to their high growth potential.”

For more information, visit www.industrialautomation.frost.com







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