subscribe
Your Career Guide
 

Why things fail, jam, rust and smudge

14th January 2016

Posted By Paul Boughton


Versaperm's VI permeability meter can help any company measure and overcome the problems caused by the world's most damaging contaminant - water vapour. It seeps into all the wrong places as it can permeate through any seal, seam or connector - and passes through the walls of any container or enclosure.

This causes electronics to fail, drugs to lose potency, printers to jam, metals to rust, seals to leak, missiles to crash, products to print poorly and a huge range of other industrial problems. Measuring the flow rates through both materials and finished products allows companies to design and manufacture better products.

Although there is no perfect answer, Versaperm's VI meter offers the next best thing and allows businesses to identify or design materials that are optimised for their individual application. The manufacturing process causes further problems as simple forming can increase the rate that water vapour passes through the product by a factor of four.

Silicone seals, for example, are a great barrier against liquid water but are so permeable that they might as well not be there when it comes to keeping water vapour in its place.

Versaperm has a range of permeability testing instrumentation to help companies accurately test and measure seals and enclosures - including individual seals, material samples and even finished units. In many cases it takes just 30 minutes to achieve results in the parts per million (PPM) range.

The system can measure several samples, seals, enclosures or products at the same time and can optionally be configured to measure permeability with respect to water vapour as well as most other gases.

The company also runs consultancy and laboratory services that offers advice on permeability in complex cases or where the volume or logistics does not mandate a dedicated instrument.









Your Career

Your Career

Newsbrief

twitter facebook linkedin © Setform Limited